‘s Perseverance rover has tried out a nifty new feature for the first time, which let it ‘spit out’ a piece of Mars rock that had been clogging its sampling tube. 

The trick means that Perseverance can now continue taking samples of rock from the Red Planet to search for possible signs of ancient life.  

The SUV-sized vehicle has been on the Red Planet since February 2021, and is slowly trundling through the Jezero Crater taking rock samples for later retrieval. 

On December 29, while retrieving a sample from a rock, its sixth so far, NASA engineers found they couldn’t get the rock to go into the storage area.

This was due to a pebble-sized piece of debris obstructing the robotic arm, blocking the entrance to the tube docking area – nearly a month later, this has been solved. 

NASA used an untested ‘un-choking procedure’, that involved pointing the drill containing a clogged test tube towards the ground and rotating it at high speed. 

This caused the pebbles to fall out, and land back on the surface of the Red Planet, even preserving the tube for use in another sampling mission. 

NASA's Perseverance rover finally 'spit out' a piece of Mars rock that had clogged its main sampling tube, allowing it to continue searching for ancient signs of life

NASA’s Perseverance rover finally ‘spit out’ a piece of Mars rock that had clogged its main sampling tube, allowing it to continue searching for ancient signs of life 

On December 29, while retrieving a sample from a rock, its sixth so far, NASA engineers found they couldn't get the rock to go into the storage area

On December 29, while retrieving a sample from a rock, its sixth so far, NASA engineers found they couldn’t get the rock to go into the storage area

Engineers were able to capture the moment the rover ‘spat out’ the pebbles and pieces of debris using the on-board Mastcam-Z science camera.

In the video you see the drill rotating as small pieces of rock come out of the end of the tube, kampus terbaik di lampung one by one, falling on to the red surface of Mars.

‘In order to keep #SamplingMars, I’ve emptied my latest partial sample,’ NASA tweeted as Perseverance, adding ‘thankfully, I can reuse this tube for another sample from the same rock.’

NASA first started the process of fixing the problem on January 15, when the team performed this experiment, using Perseverance’s rotary-percussive drill. 

This was due to a pebble-sized piece of debris obstructing the robotic arm, blocking the entrance to the tube docking area - nearly a month later, this has been solved

This was due to a pebble-sized piece of debris obstructing the robotic arm, blocking the entrance to the tube docking area – nearly a month later, this has been solved

The robotic arm orientated the drill so that the sample tube’s open end was angled nine degrees below horizontal, then set the drill rotating, spitting out some rocks. 

‘The imagery from the experiment shows a small amount of sample material falling out of the drill bit/sample tube,’ NASA wrote.

‘Later that same Martian day, the bit was positioned vertically over “Issole” (the rock that provided this latest core) to see if additional sample would fall out under the force of gravity,’ but some of the rock remained.

Then, two days later the team pointed the WATSON camera at the pebble-clogged carousel, to see just how much of the debris remained.

'In order to keep #SamplingMars, I've emptied my latest partial sample,' NASA tweeted as Perseverance, adding 'thankfully, I can reuse this tube for another sample from the same rock'

‘In order to keep #SamplingMars, I’ve emptied my latest partial sample,’ NASA tweeted as Perseverance, adding ‘thankfully, I can reuse this tube for another sample from the same rock’

NASA used an untested 'un-choking procedure', that involved pointing the drill containing a clogged test tube towards the ground and rotating it at high speed

NASA used an untested ‘un-choking procedure’, that involved pointing the drill containing a clogged test tube towards the ground and rotating it at high speed 

<div class="art-ins mol-factbox floatRHS sciencetech" data-version="2" id="mol-b37bd7b0-72ce-11ec-9d59-615a9c43e8ba" website Perseverance rover spit out pieces of Mars rock

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